Millersburg 2nd Wooden School
Contributed by Nute Chapman,Jim Hall,Sally Beatty



 	MILLERSBURG � 2ND WOODEN SCHOOL This school was built in 1898 when the village outgrew the 1st Wooden School.  It was
built at the ball park. The board then hired Mr. Judson Selleck as the teacher. As
people moved into the community the number of students increased, one hundred twenty
five were enrolled. In October Mr. Selleck asked Lucy Steele, age 16, to take the
teachers examination at Rogers City and to assist him by taking over the teaching of
the first three grades. One of the cloakrooms was used for recitations for the
younger pupils. Attendance was sporadic during the winter months and Rev. Haines
circulated a petition to continue the school term through the month of June. To
support this extension he collected one dollar from each family. It was obvious that additional rooms were necessary to accommodate the
influx of students, the board voted to add four rooms to the front of the
large one-room school. The newly constructed building was ready in the fall of 1900. Five
teachers, all graduates of the State Normal School in Ypsilanti, were hired with Mr.
Harry Thoms acting as principal. The new building provided adequate facilities for classes from grades one
through eleven. Residents of this little community were justly proud of their new school.
During the fire of 1911, the school burned. TEACHERSMr. Harry ThomsMiss Ida Hayes � 1898 Margaret McMullen � 1898 Mr. Judson Selleck � 1899Lucy Steele � 1899 grades 1-3 STUDENTS In 1910 Case Township School in Millersburg was heated by wood provided by parents.
During the summer men and boys would chop wood and stack it at the back of the school
house for the upcoming harsh winter.The school went through the eighth grade. At that time, there was a two day state
examination which you had to pass upon completion of the eighth grade. The
examination was held in Onaway so the students would take the train to Onaway and
return after the examination.You could be a certified teacher in Michigan in those days if you had your eighth
grade diploma. Compiled and Contributed by Nute Chapman, Sally Beatty, & Jim Hall

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